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MyDoc enters Hong Kong

Introduces revolutionary digital health screenings for corporates

Today (27/4), MyDoc completed their first health screening in Hong Kong. The first Hong Kong partner was Ever-Long Securities Company Limited office in Central Hong Kong for 23 employees. This is the first of two health screenings for the company.
This marks the first North Asian market for MyDoc, which greatly expands our network from Singapore, Malaysia, and Sri Lanka.
First screening of the MyDoc corporate health screening program in Hong Kong
For this first health screening, MyDoc partnered with KingMed Diagnostics as the lab provider for the health screenings, which includes body height and weight measurements, blood pressure reading, as well as tests for blood glucose, cholesterol, and other chronic conditions based on the screening packages. The lab is integrated to the MyDoc system, ensuring fast and secure transmission of results and a lower chance of errors.
The health screening includes body height and weight measurements, blood pressure reading, and blood tests
The benefits
Compared to other health screening programs, MyDoc corporate health screening offers efficiency and simplicity. Patients will have their results sent directly to their phone, which they will be able to access through the MyDoc app or web service. Added benefits also include online follow-ups in the form of text and video consultations with a doctor.
This way, patients can save time and cut down costs required for traditional, face to face follow-up consultations done in clinics or hospital. With MyDoc, they are now able to discuss their screening results and get trusted opinions from the comfort of their home or office.

The next steps
The corporate health screening program launch in Hong Kong is the first step – out of many more to come – to expand the digital health trend throughout Asia.
For MyDoc, this first step is a great opportunity for future growth and a strong validation of the significance of digital health.
As the Asia-Pacific region is aging faster than anywhere else in the world, it is easy to predict the rise in the demand for health care in the near future. It is important to adapt to this change and one solution is to adopt technology to the existing care delivery system to improve its efficiency, to be able to reach more people and catch up with the rising demand.

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