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Delicious and Nutritious Oatmeal Tofu Crepe Recipe

Oatmeal tofu crepes can be an interesting meal. Oatmeal and tofu is the perfect combination for a nutritious meal. Here is a healthy recipe for the dish as well as the science behind the goodness.

Since tofu is produced from soy milk and soybean is said to be the only vegetable that contains complete protein, that makes tofu one of the most nutritious foods in the world. Also, it is common knowledge that oatmeal reduces cholesterol and contains unique antioxidants.
Read on to find out how to cook this delicious and extremely healthy recipe.
Ingredients
For Crepes
  • ¾ cup Healthier Choice Symbol (HCS) rolled oats
  • ¾ cup HCS wholemeal flour
  • 1 ½ tbsp HCS oil
  • 1 garlic cloves, finely minced
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 2 cups of water
Filling for Crepes
  • 300 g of firm tofu, cut into 1 cm cubes
  • 1 broccoli, cut into small florets
  • 250 g pumpkin, diced into ½ cm cubes
  • 10 pcs french beans, cut into small pieces
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 medium tomato, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • Salt to taste
  • 3 tsp chicken curry powder
  • 2 tbsp HCS yoghurt
  • 1 tbsp HCS oil
Preparation
For Crepes
  1. In a blender, blend the rolled oats to a powder
  2. In a bowl, combine the blended oats, wholemeal flour, salt, and garlic
  3. Add 2 cups of water and mix well
  4. Set aside for 15 minutes allowing the mixture to thicken
  5. Heat a heavy bottomed flat pan. Spread thinly a quarter of the crepe batter into the pan. Cook on both sides until golden brown
For filling of the Crepes
  1. Heat oil in a pan. Sauté the onions and cook until translucent
  2. Add the garlic and curry powder, and sauté for a minute
  3. Add the pumpkin and cover the pan for a minute
  4. Add the tomato and beans. Cook until beans are tender
  5. Mix in the yoghurt and bring to a simmer
  6. Add the tofu and broccoli. Cook until broccoli is tender and tofu cooked through. Add salt to taste
  7. On a crepe, put some tofu filling on one end and roll into a wrap
Serves 4!
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