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MyDoc Tuesday Tips: The link between diet and depression


Health professionals have been aware of the impact of a healthy diet on mental health, which can be justified by shocking recent, newly found evidence. In a large analysis derived from expert-driven studies that involved almost 46 thousand participants, scientists noticed that an improvement in the quality of diet "significantly reduced depressive symptoms." This was particularly true for those who had meals that are rich in vegetables and fibre, low in added sugars and fast foods.


(picture from newatlas.com)
The reason for this lies within our gut, which is the host of trillions of microbes- this massive number is almost 10 times more than the total number of cells in the human body. These microbes play crucial roles in our health, that are currently undergoing studies, such as their impact on our mental health. Recently, a study of two large groups of Europeans has discovered that individuals diagnosed with depression lack several species of gut bacteria. Although it is ambiguous if the absence is a cause or a consequence of the illness, the Scientist showed that these microorganisms could produce substances that affect nerve cell function—and even mood. Furthermore, it was found that people with depression have increased bacteria that are also involved in Crohn's Disease, an inflammatory disease, suggesting that inflammation could possibly be one of the culprits that influence mental health. 

(picture from thehealth-guru.tumblr.com)
Improving diet, especially by increasing vegetables, fruits, and whole grains, as well as reducing added sugars, processed foods and saturated fats will make a difference not only to your physical health but also on your mental health. 

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